Monday, September 7, 2015

Temporary Boarders


One evening last week our renter at the lower farmhouse drove up the lane to inform Jim that a number of horses were grazing in the yard.
Jim went down with him and quickly realized that the horses were part of a group who have made a brief visit several times during the summer.

The horses belong to a compassionate couple living a mile away on the main road who 'take in' homeless horses and  give-away horses.  Horse rescuers.
This group found a weak spot in the fence and made their way cross-lots to our place.


We went down to visit the couple and assure them the horses were safe--Jim had herded them into the pasture and closed the gate.


The couple are short on pasturage and were pleased to take up Jim's offer of free grazing for the seven equines.
[Jim is tired of mowing the pasture!]


 We enjoy seeing them in the pasture.

The pasture wraps around the barn and three-sided shed, and has a pond at one end.


Two of the mares in the group have young foals.


Sometimes when I walk down the lane the horses notice and now that they are feeling settled, come to the fence to be patted.


The light-colored horse, a mare, is the 'old lady' of the group.
Behind her, tail in the air, is a gelding [called a 'gilding' by his southern-spoken owner.]


There is something very precious about foals.
There is about a months difference in the ages of these two, the colt on the left being the older.
The little filly, "Flicka," has an appealingly delicate face and slender, dainty legs.
All unknowing, they walk over the now grass-covered burying place of Pebbles-the-Horse.
We don't know how long they will be with us; I shall enjoy their presence while they are here.

20 comments:

  1. That's the best way to enjoy horses -- when someone else is feeding them! Bet they make a pretty picture on your acreage.

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    1. Jane; I think this is an ideal situation--we enjoy the horses but are not responsible for them. Although it would be easy to begin feeling an attachment to them.

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  2. I think horses are such majestic, wonderful creatures, not that I have any personal relationships with horses, just my thoughts from seeing pictures and videos of them.

    You and your neighbors are blessed to have them in your lives.

    Have a great week ~ FlowerLady

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    1. Rainey; I can echo your thoughts re horses. I am a bit afraid of their size close up, but admire their beauty. Each of those I have known had their own distinct personality. I enjoy visiting these 'boarders' when I walk down the lane.

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  3. That is a win win situation, the horses enjoy the grass and you don't need to mow it. How good the kind hearted lady has adopted them.

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    1. Terra; I can't imagine how this couple manages to provide feed for so many horses during the winter. I have wondered if the mares were in foal before they were adopted--the numbers may increase!
      The horses add a certain 'air' to the farm.

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  4. How nice. I would love that. Your neighbours are very kind to take them on. Deb

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    1. Deb; It is so difficult for animal lovers to ignore a horse--or dog--or cat in need of a good home. I often wish we could do much more. We inherited sturdy fences on this farm, so we are glad to share our pasture.

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  5. It's good to know that there are people willing to help horses like these who need a home. Well done to both you and your neighbours.

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    1. Rowan; I suspect this couple are straining their financial resources to provide basic care for their adopted horses--I believe they have collected more than 2 dozen. Their kindly hearts are larger than their wallets.

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  6. Ah, that happens so often over here too. The do-gooders end up taking on too many for their acreage.

    Glad that you are helping them out, but I think they need to look to mending their fencing!

    A nice little herd anyway, and keeping your pasture in trim. The foals are sweet, especially little Flicka. (Remember those books from my childhood).

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    1. Jennie; One of the owners, Joe, told us he had found the weak area of their fence and mended it. Their acreage is divided into a number of smaller pastures.
      Our pasture hosts clumps of 'cockleburrs' which the horses don't find tempting, so there is now nicely chewed grass dotted with bristly patches.
      Yes, the Mary O'Hara stories of Flicka and Thunderhead.
      When living in Wyoming we located the general area of the Remount Ranch, the setting of Mary O'Hara's books. A friend had been raised on a neighboring ranch and said that Mary's husband was locally remembered as 'the Austrian.' Most biographical notes refer to him as a Swede. It seems his background was a bit shifty.
      Here is a link to a brief history of Remount Ranch. http://www.remountranch.com/history.asp

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  7. Perfect; all the joy of horses with none of the responsibility and expense.

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    1. John; You have perfectly summarized the situation here!

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  8. The horses are all so beautiful. How kind of you, but also how wonderful for you, to be able to have them so close.

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    1. Lillian; I don't think we feel we've been unusually 'kind'--the horses are doing a splendid job of 'mowing' the pasture--other than the cockleburrs--and they are most decorative. I particularly enjoy the foals.

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  9. How lovely to have horses to admire and fuss. Their owners must have been thrillled to be offered extra grazing. They all look very well, sleek and rounded.

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    1. Kath; The horses were stand-offish the first few days they were here--now they enjoy a bit of attention. They do look healthy, although I noticed several could use the services of a farrier. I hope the owners are able to winter them well.

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  10. What a lovely view, horses in the field. I loved having horses when we were younger. I think I enjoyed taking care of them more than I did riding them.

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    1. Janet; I've never been a rider. I have helped care for the horses Jim has kept over the years--some were nicer than others. Pebbles was a very special horse. Still, horses are very LARGE--and I tend to keep my distance from their feet!

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